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The Language of the Age

April 25, 2011 Harvard ILJ 1

One of the most memorable images of the Egyptian Revolution is that of hundreds of people lined up for Islamic prayer in Tahrir Square in Cairo, in Alexandria, and in all of the other cities around the country. Hundreds organized into neat rows, standing, bowing, and prostrating in tandem to perform Islamic ritual prayer as they endured assaults of hot gushing water and tear gas by riot police. For a number of political analysts and commentators, such images of public religiosity and religious performance throughout the course of the Egyptian Revolution proved to be challenging, if not confusing. For some, it appeared paradoxical, if not incongruous, that despite the decidedly prominent role of expressions of Islamicity, whether through forms of expression of Islamic identity, such as collective prayer, or the invocation of Islamic symbolism, or the usage of Islamic phrases, the Egyptian Revolution was not a call for a theocratic government or an Islamic government.

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After the Last Judgment

April 25, 2011 Harvard ILJ 0

We begin by providing a brief overview of the Egyptian Constitution. We then discuss some of the main amendments that the Egyptian Constitutional Amendment Committee proposed and that were recently adopted by public referendum. Finally, we recommend a few other amendments that Egypt should consider after parliamentary elections take place.

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Public Corruption and the Egyptian Revolution of January 25

April 25, 2011 Harvard ILJ 0

The Egyptian people discovered, however, that in the absence of internal democracy, it was impossible to preserve the gains of the previous revolutions. The January 25 Revolution therefore affirmed the centrality of democracy to the Egyptian national movement, not just as a utopian goal—one whose practical implementation would be indefinitely deferred—but rather as the foundation for a modern, independent, and prosperous Egypt.

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Revising Egypt’s Constitution

February 22, 2011 Harvard ILJ 1

The transition under way in Egypt is constitutional. A constitutional transition is the most important task for sealing in law the future of post-Mubarak Egypt and for ensuring peaceful political change.This modest Article seeks to identify key revisions to Egypt’s Constitution and discusses the possibility of comprehensive constitutional redrafting. The Article also argues that the judiciary is uniquely positioned to lead the project of constitutional amendment.